Setting Stator Wind Depth The Paper Cp Test

Permanentmagnet Paper clip

No need to over complicate this process Take one permanent magnet, and one paperclip Place on smooth surface, and push paper clip towards pm Note distance at which paper clip flies into face of magnet Repeat to verify test result Your stator winding depth is now set

Mr Adams refers to using batteries to 'tune,' his motor at low voltage (9-12v), before taking his motor up to the 120v or 240v range, which is where the real action happens. No exact guidance is given on how to do this however. Now I have built my motor, I have found a very simple way to tune an Adams motor. Basically you just put your finger on the power transistor. It is that simple. With tuning I have found you can always eliminate the heat from the transistor. Now, that may mean closing the air gap, increasing rotor stability, rewiring the stator, or improving the timing circuit, etc. Whatever. I am just pointing out that having assembled something, you should expect to spend 3/4 nights, or more, fiddling with it to get best results. Only when you have built, detested (sic), shaken down, and tuned a basic 1 / 2 stator 'soft,' design, should you move onto something harder with more poles, stronger magnets and so on.

'It was in the switch closure, the very instant of closure and break, which thrust the effect out into space' -

Nikola Tesla

Yes. I have seen no evidence whatsoever with my motor that there are any 'difficult' rpms. At 12v it runs smooth, fast, and stone cold. The dynamic pulse duration optimization my motor delivers by timing directly off the faces of the magnets must help in this respect. It 'wants' to go as fast as possible, and seems much 'happier,' and indeed colder, at higher speeds than lower speeds. This is in line with statements made by Tesla and others on the properties of cold current, where short pulses (read high rpms) are to be preferred.

The nails need to be sensibly picked. What I mean is too large and a ferrite / ceramic magnet can not permeate them properly and the rotor gets 'stuck' in register, too small, and the initial attraction of the magnet to the nail head is too weak. BALANCE. Basically you need to buy 3/4 packs of suitable looking nails and play around. My nails were carefully picked with these design parameters in mind. I observed with simple hand experiments that the 125mms tended to get 'stuck' in front of magnet faces, the 75 mms offered less initial rotor attraction, so that basically left me with the 100mm long 8.5mm head nails, because they offered all the qualities I was looking for. Excellent rotor magnet initial attraction, easy demagnetization, with no 'stuck' in register problem. Everything I wanted. Basically, about 3/8" head diameter is a good size to pair up with 6/8" ceramic magnets, combined with a 12v pulse. I also used nails with a sloping transition from body to head, and NOT straight right angle. I figured this would make flux passage from nail body to head easier. Lightly sanding down the nail head is probably not a bad idea either. I also used mild / bright / soft steel nails because of the reduced carbon content and improved magnetic conduction properties. All these little things add up, take every tiny optimization you can.

Tesla Switch

'It was in the switch closure, the very instant of closure and break, which thrust the effect out into space' -

Nikola Tesla

Alternative Energy

Alternative Energy

It seems like the efforts to find the best alternative energy sources are seriously being looked into by lots of countries including most US cities. One proof is the signing of the Kyoto Treaty. The main aim of the concerned group and individuals is to lessen the greenhouse gases and pollutants.

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