Transport

4.23 Traffic required by an installation is a constraint on the uptake of biomass energy. Small rural roads or streets in urban housing developments are not suitable for large numbers of lorry movements and the siting of a plant must take into account the need to keep to a minimum the increased traffic caused by fuel deliveries.

4.24 Table 4.2 illustrates the different delivery requirements of different scale plants by fuel type83. The table shows that small heating or CHP plants require relatively few deliveries. The Leicester district heating plant, for example, will need only two deliveries per day, five days a week and will store sufficient fuel on-site to cover weekends and holidays. Any v www.woodfuelresource.org.uk

vi Under existing EU legislation there is a Third Party Finance Initiative (TPFI) that underwrites energy loans under a payback scheme. This will be replaced in 2006 by the Energy Services Company (ESCO) directive which will be easier to implement that the TPFI.

increase in road traffic resulting from the operation of the facility will be an important factor in the planning of any new biomass project. Also, over a period when, the Commission believes, road transport should be decreasing84 it is important to ensure that journey distances are minimised and to seek alternative modes of fuel delivery.

Table 4.2 Deliveries required by plant size and fuel type

Plant

(/day) straw bales

Deliveries (/day) miscanthus bales

Large scale biomass combustion (30MWe)

120

21

28

17

Large scale biomass gasification (30MWe)

120

17

23

13

Small scale biomass combustion (5MWe)

120

5

6

4

Small scale biomass gasification (500kWe)

60

1

1

1

Industrial biomass heat (1 MWth)

60

0.5

1

0.5

Co-firing 5% biomass (25 MW )

120

16

22

13

Based on references above, using density values of 0.15 m3/t for wood chips (Suurs, 2002), 0.11 m3/t for straw and 0.19 m3/t for miscanthus (Bullard, 1999)

0 0

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