Chungs Negative Resistor and Naudins Replication

Chung {676} has reported replicable negative resistance in the interfaces between layers of carbon fibers in a composite material. By varying the pressure used when the fibers are made, the resistance can be controlled to later be negative or positive as desired. A simpler version of Chung's negative resistor using off-the-shelf materials has been successfully replicated and tested by Naudin {677}. (See Figure 11-3). Naudin's website {677} provides measurements and full details necessary for repetition. He also includes sources of the carbon fiber materials needed lor independent replication.

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Figure 11 -3 Naudin's replication of Chung's negative resistor.

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Figure 11 -3 Naudin's replication of Chung's negative resistor.

11.10.2 The Point Contact Transistor

There is also evidence that the original point contact transistor — which used spring pressure on the point contact — often exhibited true negative resistance. Certainly this transistor was never adequately understood {678}, and it is not understood today, since its supersystem has never been analyzed.

11.10.3 Kron's Negative Resistor

Gabriel Kron, early pioneer in electrical systems theory, reported developing a negative resistor in the 1930s, on the U.S. Navy's Network Anayzer project {679} at Stanford University. He was not permitted to reveal the details of his negative resistor, but did provide strong hints in certain statements in his papers in the literature {680a, 680b}. His method for a self-organizing network depended on his "open path" {681} which he also was not permitted to reveal.

The present author worked for some years with Floyd Sweet, a Kron protege", who did produce a successful type of powerful negative resistance system {682} known as the vacuum triode amplifier, apparently based on Kron's original negative resistor. Sec Figures 6-5 to 6-13 in Chapter 6. As shown in Figure 6-6, Sweet induced self-oscillation in barium ferrite magnets {683a-683c} (which are made by powder metallurgy methods using pressure applied during their manufacture) and extracted energy by induction from the resulting self-sustained magnetic field oscillations. His device was independently tested by Walter Rosenthal {684}, a senior test engineer of long experience with a major aerospace company. See Figure 6-9 and Figure 6-13.

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