Transformer Secondary Shunted by a Negative Resistor

See Figure 6-33. This embodiment assumes the availability of a true negative resistor — possibly an adaptation of a point contact transistor or other device. As shown in the figure, a transformer exhibiting COP> 1.0 can be developed by adding a shunting true (not differential!) negative resistor across the terminals of the secondary, adjacent to the secondary. In this manner, the Lorentz symmetry of the closed unitary current loop containing the external loads and losses, and normally the secondary of the transformer in series, is broken.

Part of the return spent current is now "pumped" back up from ground side to power side of the transformer secondary without passing through the secondary. The pumping work is providing by dissipation (in the negative resistor) of energy freely obtained from the active vacuum environment. In short, one adds a ncgcntropic process in parallel with the secondary coil, in the secondary external circuit, breaking the otherwise enforced Lorentz symmetrical regauging of the discharge of the collected EM excitation energy in the secondary circuit. This provides the capability for a permissible COP>1.0 transformer.

ON EACH HALF CYCLE, ONE OF THE NEGATIVE RESISTORS SHUNTS PART OF THE RETURN CURRENT AROUND THE SECONDARY, FROM LOWSIDE TO HIGH SIDE, THUS DECREASING THE BACK-FIELD COUPLING FROM SECONDARY TO PRIMARY ACROSS THF TRANSFORMER. THIS LESSENS THE ENERGY DISSIPATION REQUIRED IN THE PRIMARY FOR A GIVEN ENERGY FLOW TRANSFER FROM PRIMARY TO SECONDARY

Figure 6-33 Transformer shunted by a negative resistor.

In theory, if the negative resistor can bypass all the current in the secondary, or almost all of it, the transformer can become a COP»1.0 device.

This overunity transformer can use step-up of the voltage from primary to secondary, and exhibits an asymmetry in its forward and backward field coupling between primary and secondary. Thus the dissipation of energy in the primary circuit need not be as great as the dissipation of energy in the secondary circuit. The energy flows are of course in perfect conservation, but there is no law of nature requiring the energy dissipations to be conservative between the primary and the secondary. It is strictly the backfield coupling from secondary to primary that enforces equal energy dissipation in the primary as in the secondary, in normal transformers. And that backfield coupling's strength is a function of the return current through the transformer secondary. By reducing that current, the back coupling to the primary is reduced, which in turn reduces the current draw of the primary from the external power supply.

No laws of physics, electrodynamics, or thermodynamics are violated by the asymmetrically coupled transformer power system with broken symmetry in its secondary to primary circuit couplings. In short, there is less backfield coupling from primary to secondary than there is from secondary back to primary. The additional energy dissipated in the secondary circuit is freely extracted from the vacuum by the negative 4-resistor shunt.

Again, this application assumes the availability of a true negative resistor, to use as a shunt of the secondary.

The beauty of this application is that, once achieved, such a COP>1.0 transformer can easily be close-looped for self-powering by standard "governed" positive feedback. No concern as to hole current effects usually need be accounted for unless the COP becomes very large.

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