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aTotal number and percent of stations in class higher than 3 are listed in the last row.

aTotal number and percent of stations in class higher than 3 are listed in the last row.

Figure 3. Same as Figure 2, but for observed wind speed at 10 m.

overall 14.2% of the European stations are in class 3 or greater. Europe also has the densest station spatial coverage of all continents, as indicated by the Coverage Index (206), calculated as the average number of stations per million km2 of area.

[29] In South America (Figure 5), most available stations are in class <2 and are thus not suitable for wind power generation. A few exceptions are in the Caribbean Islands to the south-east of Cuba (where 13/41 stations, or 32%, were in class >3), the Antilles islands, the southern tips of Chile and Argentina, and the coastal area of Argentina between Bahia Blanca and Peninsula Valdes. Mexico presents a few isolated class >3 stations in the northeast and along the Yucatan Peninsula. Similar results were found at 50 meters by Schwartz and Elliott [1995]. Overall, the average wind speed in South America is 4.2 m/s (class 1), but this result should be taken with caution, as the Coverage Index is low (20 in Table 3).

[30] In Australia (Figure 6), the greatest potential is near coastal locations. All the islands in the Coral Sea belong to class 4 or higher; in Tasmania, the number of stations in class 7(10) alone is greater than the number of stations in class 1 (6); the coastline between Melbourne and

Adelaide, and the areas to the south of Perth and Dampier have over 25 locations in class > 5. Overall, Oceania has good spatial coverage (Coverage Index between 50 and 100) and an enormous potential for wind power, with 21% of stations in class > 3 (Table 3).

[31] North America is shown in Figure 7. In the United States, the central belt (including North and South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, and Oklahoma), previously identified by Elliott et al. [1986], Schwartz and Elliott [2001], and Archer and Jacobson [2003], was found in this study to be one of the most promising continental areas for wind power in the world (average wind speed ^7.0 m/s, class 3). The eastern and southern coasts offer good potential as well, especially offshore. A new finding is the area of the Great Lakes, where the average wind power class is 6 (8.46 m/s), a wind potential shared by U.S. and Canada. Both coasts of Canada show a high number of class 7 stations (17 on the east and 7 on the west), especially around the Vancouver and Newfoundland Islands. High-resolution work in Canada, overall consistent with Figure 7, is in progress by the Canadian Meteorological Center and some preliminary results can be found at http://www.cmc.ec.gc.ca/rpn/ modcom/eole/CanadianAtlas.html.

Table 2. Number of Sounding and Surface Stations for Which Calculated Wind Power Class at 80 m Is Equal, Greater, or Smaller Than Their Observed Wind Power Class at 10 m, Listed by 10-m Wind Power Class, for Stations With 20 or More Valid Readings

Sounding Stations_ _Surface Stations

Table 2. Number of Sounding and Surface Stations for Which Calculated Wind Power Class at 80 m Is Equal, Greater, or Smaller Than Their Observed Wind Power Class at 10 m, Listed by 10-m Wind Power Class, for Stations With 20 or More Valid Readings

Sounding Stations_ _Surface Stations

Class10

Classgo — Classio

Class80 > Class10

Class80 < Class10

Class80 — Class10

Class80 > Class10

Class80 < Class10

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Renewable Energy Eco Friendly

Renewable Energy Eco Friendly

Renewable energy is energy that is generated from sunlight, rain, tides, geothermal heat and wind. These sources are naturally and constantly replenished, which is why they are deemed as renewable.

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