Materials

- 18 square birch plywood 1 2 thick, qty 2 - 16 diameter birch plywood disk, 1 2 thick - 5.75 birch plywood disk, 1 2 thick - 1 2 - 13 tpi threaded rod 2.5 long - 13 3 4 long wood screws Find the center of the square. (an easy way is to draw light lines from corner to corner -where they intersect is center). Use a compass to draw 3 circles on the bottom of the mold. One should be 8 diameter, one 12 diameter, and one 15.5 diameter. The space between the 8 dia and the 12 dia circles is the area...

Alternator Assembly

This page details how we assemble our alternator from all the finished parts. At this point we've completed all the metal work and it's been painted. The magnet rotors and the stator are finished, and we're finally assembling the machine. Pictured above are the finished magnet rotors. They are identical, except that the front rotor (closest on the left in the picture) has 8 holes, 4 for the studs, and 4 for jacking screws which will allow us to lower it safely and raise it back off the...

Parts List

- W Plywood disk 6 diameter -W Plywood disk 4 diameter -3 8 plywood rectangle, x 1.5 -5 8 plywood disk 6 diameter -1 wooden dowel 2.5 long -1.5 steel square tubing 7 long -1 x W steel barstock 5 long, qty 2 -5 16 - 18 bolt, 3.5 long -5 16 - 18 bolt, 2.5 long -W SAE washer, qty 2 -5 16 - 18 wing nut -16 Penny nail, qty 5 First step is to cut out some metal parts. I find the portable metal cutting band saw fast and easy, but a hack saw, sawzall or even a torch would work fine. In building wind...

Building the magnet rotors

Hydro Rotor Templates

- 12 diameter mild steel disk, 1 4 thick, qty 2 - 1 x 2 x 1 2 N35 grade NdFeB magnets, qty 24 - cyanocrylate glue with accelerator - fiberglass cloth or mat, 2 square feet - 1 2 gallon polyester resin Start with two steel disks, 12 diameter. Each disk should have 4 1 2 holes on a 4 diameter circle(a touch larger to provide some clearance is nice) and a 2.75 hole in the center. You can build a rotating table and do a pretty neat job cutting these out with an oxy-acetaline cutting torch, but we...

Materials list

Aluminum Free Energy

3 full wave bridge rectifiers, minimum 35 amp rating 1 Aluminum heat sink Terminal blocks Silicone heat sink compound 12 Spade connectors for 10 gage wire A few feet of 10 gage wire The full wave bridge rectifier has 4 leads. Two leads (on opposite corners) accept incoming alternating current, and the other two give Direct Current out. Sometimes all 4 leads are marked, but in most cases only the positive (+) DC lead is marked. Usually the positive lead will have a flat corner near it, and the...

Building The Magnet Rotors The Mold

How Build Wind Alternator

The alternator requires two rotors to be built. The first step is to build a wooden mold. Each rotor will be made from 12 diameter steel disks each with 12 magnets on it. Once we've built the rotors we'll cast polyester resin around them to keep the magnets in place and prevent corrosion. In order to make a neat casting we need to build a mold out of plywood. Like many other things in these plans, there are alternative ways of doing things. Here we'll detail exactly what we've done. Some of the...

Turbine Blade Assembly

Disk Turbine Fermenter Blade Image

At this point you've carved 3 nearly identical wind turbine blades. This next section will detail how we assemble them. Following is the list of materials and hardware required to assemble the blades. Some of this is optional, certain things could be done differently. Some folks prefer to glue the blades hubs togther - this design is such that you can disassemble the blade set should you ever need to replace parts. - 1.25 galvanized wood screws, qty 60 - 5 16 - 18tpi 3 long carriage bolts, qty...

Wiring the stator

The drawing shows how we'll wire the coils together. Each phase is numbered and consists of 3 coils in series. We define each coil and each phase to have a 'start' and an 'end'. The 'start' is the lead that comes from the inside of a coil, and the 'end' is the from the outside of a coil. The only thing not shown in the drawing is the 'star' connection. In the drawing the starts are labelled A, B, and C, the ends are labelled X,Y, and Z To make the star connection you'll connect the 3 starts A,...

Homebrew Wind Power

This chapter will describe how we build the 'frame' for the wind turbine. This involves a fair bit of metal work. To do this you'll need to have the ability to cut grind and weld steel. If you're new to this type of work it might pay to practice your skills on some scraps. The tolerances with this are not terribly, again - the design is very forgiving. But some of the welds are critical so you need to be a bit careful. Also keep in mind the dangers of metal work. This is the most dangerous work...

Carve the pitch on the front of the blade

Wind Blade Drawing

At the tip of the blade the pitch is about 3 deg. At the center R 30 inches it's about 6 deg. Near the root, where we stop carving it's as steep as our board will allow. The drawings do not discuss the angle of pitch,. Instead they show the amount of wood that must be removed from the blade along the trailing edge. The image might seem a bit confusing. In the image center, end view you're looking at the leading edge of the blade, and the darkened area is the material that must be removed from...

Carving the Blades

The blades are perhaps the most important part of our wind turbine - they are the 'engine' that drives our generator. These wind turbine blades have a simple airfoil and when finished they'll look and work a bit like airplane wings. This design is a simple one. It's a compromise we made keeping the following things in mind efficiency, strength, cost and availability of materials, and ease of construction. Before you start a few terms should be defined. The 'tip' of the blade is the end that's...

Coil Winder Instructions

Before we can build our wind turbine there are a few tools we need to make. We'll need to make moulds for the magnet rotors and the stator, and we need to make a coil winder. It's simply a spool made from wood, with a crank that we can wind our coils on. The next couple of pages will detail exactly how we made ours, but the idea here is simple and there are surely many simpler ways to do this. Some of the thoughts that went into this design included having a fairly large crank which makes...

Winding the Coils

Pico Turbine Generator Star

Pictured above Scott's winding with two strands of wire. This is necessary for 12 Volt machines. The magnet wire you need depends on the voltage of your system. Roughly speaking, every time we go up 3 sizes in magnet wire then the wire has half the cross sectional area. The voltage of the machine is directly related to the number of turns in the coils. If we double the number of turns, then we double the voltage. No matter what the voltage of the machine, the coil size and weight needs to...