References

1. Duffield, W.A., J.H. Sass, and M.L. Sorey, "Tapping the Earth's Natural Heat," U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1125, 1994.

2. Muffler, L.J.P, ed., "Assessment of Geothermal Resource of the United States -- 1978," U.S. Geologic Survey Circular 790, 1979.

3. U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Outlook 1996, DOE/EIA -0603(96), August 1996.

4. U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration, Geothermal Energy in the Western United States and Hawaii: Resources and Projected Electricity Generation Supplies, U.S. Department of Energy, DOE/EIA-0544, September 1991.

5. Tester, J.W., and H.J. Herzog, Economic Predictions for Heat Mining: A Review and Analysis of Hot Dry roc k (HDR) Geothermal Energy Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology: July 1990.

6. Brugman, J., Hattar, M., Nichols, K., and Y. Esaki, Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants, Electric Power Research Institute: February 1996. Report EPRI TR-106223.

Solar Stirling Engine Basics Explained

Solar Stirling Engine Basics Explained

The solar Stirling engine is progressively becoming a viable alternative to solar panels for its higher efficiency. Stirling engines might be the best way to harvest the power provided by the sun. This is an easy-to-understand explanation of how Stirling engines work, the different types, and why they are more efficient than steam engines.

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