The Nature Of Electricity

What were the old ether physicists referring to when they attempted to describe "an incompressible, perfect fluid"? What would a "perfect fluid" do? It would be able to "wet" everything it came into contact with, such as protons, and could flow everywhere without resistance. One "fluid"—the ether—could flow everywhere, and because of its density and ultra-fineness, nothing could stop it, and it felt ao resistance, but only matter felt resistance, depending on the circumstances. Another fluid—electricity—could flow in certain places, and wet only certain things, but often met resistance.

In order to understand the ether, we must get to know electricity more intimately. Just like water, a proton will hold only so much electricity on its surface, but the 'surface' of the proton is probably similar to the outer area of a ball-shaped swarm of hovering mechanical bees, powered by the ZPR, with a denser agglomeration of "bees" toward the 'ball's' center. If this swarm of bees is subjected to a wave of rainy mist (the etheric 'wind'), the bees must all turn to face into the etheric wind to maintain their formation. The 'water' droplets—electric sub-charges carried by the etheric wind—tend to agglomerate around the front side. Each bee, as he flaps his wings, will get wet only so much, so that excess 'water' is thrown off and carried to the next bee, or the next swarm of bees, by the etheric wind, and so forth, so that a 'current' of droplets continues to flow through the ball of bees due to its motion through the etheric wind, and transfers momentum between masses.

The 'water' tends to come off in larger drops, which have formed from smaller droplets accumulated on each bee. As in fluid mechanics.

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