Case Lagerwey LW wind turbine

The Lagerwey LW-50/750 wind turbine is located near Nieuwe-Tonge, Province of Zuid-Holland, The Netherlands. Fig. 4.13 shows a schematic of the measurement set-up of the full-scale modal test. The turbine was parked (i.e. non-rotating) during all testing. This implies that the bilateral coupling of the mechanical module to the electrical module, see Fig. 3.14 on page 69, can be omitted since the mechanical speed is equal to zero. Furthermore, the input from the aerodynamic module, Faero, is replaced by a static load applied to the tower top (hereby assuming that the structural response caused by wind excitation on the rotor blades, nacelle and tower is negligible).

Figure 4.13: Schematic of the measurement set-up of the full-scale modal test performed on the Lagerwey LW-50/750 wind turbine. Sensor locations are marked with a I. The rotor was yawed —90 degrees about the y-axis during the experiments.

The mechanical structure is excited by applying the aforementioned static load to the tower top of the Lagerwey LW-50/750 wind turbine, and suddenly releasing this load via a quick release mechanism. The structure was instrumented with one force transducer in-line with the cable to measure the applied load, and 19 accelerometers on both the tower and the three rotor blades to measure the resulting response. The accelerometer mounting locations are marked with a I in Fig. 4.13. Observe that the mounting and removing of the accelerometers from the rotor blades require a crane due to the size of the wind turbine (D = 50.5 m and H = 46.165 m).

The goal of this test is to validate the DAWIDUM model(s) of this wind turbine by comparing measured and simulated natural frequencies as well as time-domain simulations to measured responses. When the correlation with the modal test data

Wind Turbine Schematic

Figure 4.13: Schematic of the measurement set-up of the full-scale modal test performed on the Lagerwey LW-50/750 wind turbine. Sensor locations are marked with a I. The rotor was yawed —90 degrees about the y-axis during the experiments.

is not satisfactory, the time domain data can be used to update (some of) the model parameters following the approach that will be presented in Chapter 5. In the next paragraphs the applied excitation technique, the performed pre-test analysis as well as the results will be discussed in detail.

Renewable Energy Eco Friendly

Renewable Energy Eco Friendly

Renewable energy is energy that is generated from sunlight, rain, tides, geothermal heat and wind. These sources are naturally and constantly replenished, which is why they are deemed as renewable.

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