Visual Impact

The State of Vermont has a scoring system for possible adverse visual impact of small wind turbines from two different vantage points [17]: private property (the neighbors' view) and public views (roads, recreation, and natural areas). For the neighbors' view the considerations are: (1) What is the position of the turbine in the view? (2) How far away is the turbine seen? (3) How prominent is the turbine? (4) Can the turbine be screened from view? For public views there are two additional considerations: (5) Is the turbine seen from an important scenic or natural area? (6) What is the duration of the view? Each is rated by a point system (Table 9.1), with a total of 12 points for the residential

TABLE 9.1

Criteria for Points for Visual Impact of Small Wind Turbines

Neighbor View Public View

TABLE 9.1

Criteria for Points for Visual Impact of Small Wind Turbines

Neighbor View Public View

1

2

3

4

5

6

View Angle

Distance

Prominent

Screened

Vista

Duration

Points

Degree

m

sec

0

>90

>900

Below treetops

Complete

Degraded

0

1

0-45

450-900

At horizon line

Multiple trees

Common

<15

Single tree,

2

50-60

150-450

Above horizon line

1/2-2/3

Scenic

<30

3

60-90

<150

Above tallest mountain

No screening

Highly scenic

>60

Renewable Energy 101

Renewable Energy 101

Renewable energy is energy that is generated from sunlight, rain, tides, geothermal heat and wind. These sources are naturally and constantly replenished, which is why they are deemed as renewable. The usage of renewable energy sources is very important when considering the sustainability of the existing energy usage of the world. While there is currently an abundance of non-renewable energy sources, such as nuclear fuels, these energy sources are depleting. In addition to being a non-renewable supply, the non-renewable energy sources release emissions into the air, which has an adverse effect on the environment.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment