Pitcairn Pa Engine Kinner Hp

Pictures Pitcairn

Pitcaim PA-18 built about J 931 for the sportsman and private user. About 19 of these were built and sold. Seven or eight of these were recalled during WWII and rebuilt as PA-39. All but one of them were lost when their transport was sunk Note auxiliary nose "training" wheel (Pitcairn Photo)

J'CAA AIRCRAFT LISTING" PITCAIRN PA-18, 2 PO-CLAg, ATC 478

Engine Kinner R-5 160 hp.

Fuel 30 gals.

Oil 3Vz gals.

Baggage 10 lbs.

Standard wt. 1950 lbs. Spec. Basis Approved Type Cert. No. 478 Serial Nos. G-62 and up mfrd. prior to 930-39 eligible. Approval expired as of that date.

Class I equipment: Fixed metal propeller; Dual controls; Seat cushions 9 lbs.; Battery 10 lbs.; Heywood starter 32 lbs,; 10 lbs. ballast in tail. Class III equipment: Safety wheel installation 12 lbs,; Adj. meta! propeller, 5 lbs. net increase; Coupe top 3 lbs. net increase.

Specifications

Gross weight Empty weight Useful load Fuel capacity Oil capacity

Pitcaim PA-18 built about J 931 for the sportsman and private user. About 19 of these were built and sold. Seven or eight of these were recalled during WWII and rebuilt as PA-39. All but one of them were lost when their transport was sunk Note auxiliary nose "training" wheel (Pitcairn Photo)

Engine Philadelphia
Pitcaim PA-18 at Wings Field near Philadelphia. Pilot Paul "Skip" Lukens, owner, and passenger Ann Strawbridge of the department store family, (Pitcaim Photo)
Pitcairn Family

Pitcairn PA-18

(Pitcairn Photo)

Pitcairn PA-18

(Pitcairn Photo)

Pitcairn Fuel
Pitcairn PA-18 demonstrating "dead stick" landing. (Pitcairn Photo)
Pitcairn FamilyPitcairn Family

Left to right PitcairnPA-36 (2) AC35, PA-22 andPA-18 inside the Pitcairn Factory, now by Tinius-Olsen Testing Company in Horsham (Willow Grove) P/\. (Pitcairn Photo)

james G. Ray, Pitcairn's chief pilot. Beside a PA-lfi autogiro,

(Pitcairn Photo)

The fate of some PA-18s caused by applying power suddenly when flying too slow for aileron control (Howard Levy Photo)

Aileron Power Control

The fate of some PA-18s caused by applying power suddenly when flying too slow for aileron control (Howard Levy Photo)

Jean Harlow Tortilla Factory
A Piiteirn PA-18 at a Detroit Aircraft show in the thirties. (Pitcairn Photo)
Pictures Pitcairn

Italian pilot, Tito Falconi and movie actress Jean Harlow of the thirties, in front of a Pitcairn PA-18.

(John Underwood Photo)

Military Aircraft Illustrations
Pitcairn PA-20 owned by Eerle Eckel, modified with en enclosure omtr the reartàckpit TTiiS is not considered a PA-24, which had both cockpits covered. ' (Pi,cairn Phot°)

"CAA AIRCRAFT LISTING" PITCAIRN PA-24, 2 POLAg, ATC 507

Engine Kinner B-5 160 lip

Fuel 27 gals. (One in fuselage)

011 3Vz gals. No. pass. 1 Baggage 13 lbs. Standard weight 1800 lbs.

Spec, basis Approved Type Certificate

No. 507

Serial Nos. 57 to 61 eligible.

(See NOTE 1) Class 1 equipment: Starter (Heywood) 32 lbs.; Ballast 16 lbs.; Auxiliary fins 4 lbs.; Safety wheel

12 lbs.; Propeller adj. metal.

NOTE 1. Serial Nos. 19, 32 to 41, incl., 52 to 56, incl., and 72 (formerly model PAA-1 or PA-20) eligible for conversion to this Model provided Curtiss 5551 1-48 propeller is used with diameter of 8 ft. and repitched to 57 in.

Specifications

Gross weight 1750 lbs.

1178 lbs. \572 lbs. 90 mph 75 mph 20-25 mph 550 fpm 10,000 ft. 57,650,00

Empty weight Useful load Top speed Cruise

Landing speed Rate of climb (first minute) Service ceiling Selling price

A total of about twenty-five autogiros consisting of models PAA-1, PA-24, PA-20 were built. A memo from W. C. Clayton of Pitcairn Engineering Department announces the model differences:

"s/n s F-18 to F-21, F-32 to F-41, F-52 to F-56 anc F-72 are PAA-1 sand are not to be changed, s/n: F-57 to F-61 are PA-20s. Any PA-20 or PAA-1 could be changed to a PA-24 by installing a Kinner B-5 engine,"

The memo is dated May 9,1933. Performance i: not given. Approved Type Certificate 478 wa: granted April 7,1932. Metal prop was standard electrical or air starter, fire extinguisher, naviga tion lights and dual controls were optional.

Pitcairn Pca

Pitcairn PCA-2. PA-19, Kettel K-3, PAA-1 and PA ÍS autogiros at Pitcairn Field.

(Pitcairn Photo)

Late in 1932, the Pitcairn Autogiro Company announced that after extensive flight tests on an experimental model they were ready to produce a four-place cabin autogiro designated the PA-19. This design was the work and responsibility of Robert B, C. Noorduyn who had recently joined the Pitcairn organization as Executive Engineer. Noorduyn had previously held the position of Vice President with Bellan-ca. The announcement stated that several new features were included in the design of this craft. The chief new feature was the "tilt-adjusting rotor." This meant that the pilot could select an optimum setting for the angle of the rotor hub axis. The control of this axis was through the use of a crank in the ceiling of the autogiro like an adjustable stabilizer or trim tab control found in the cabin ceiling of many aircraft today. Five full turns of the crank would adjust the rotor axis from one end of the travel to the other. Changing the angle in this way permitted the aircraft to accommodate a greater center of gravity range. Other features were the cantilever arrangement of the wings, tail surfaces and landing gear. The net result of these features in design combined both good autogiro characteristics with stability and control expected of well-designed fixed-wing aircraft of the day. The main criteria considered according to the manufacturer were strength, reliability, ease of maintenance, comfort and appearance.

The fuselage frame was constructed of welded steel tubing. Particular attention was paid to the designing of the structure to avoid placing of structural members across the area covered by windows or pilot's windshield. The design and shape of the fuselage was chosen to give maximum visibility from the pilot's position and to afford most comfort to the passengers. The engine was kept as low as possible in order to improve the visibility for the pilot. The fuselage at the front seat was made as narrow as could be without sacrificing leg room. The windows on each side of the pilot's station at the floor line afforded a view of the area ahead and below the aircraft. This was particularly useful during steep or vertical approaches possible with the autogiro. All windows, except those two at floor line were of laminated safety glass. The two higher windows at the pilot's right and left were raised and lowered by automobile-type window cranks. All other windows were fitted with rubber channels and sealed with non-hardening composition. The manufacturer boasted that the "upholstery was luxurious following the trends of the highest class automobiles." A careful study was made of springing and stuffing materials, seating angles and back shapes. The

Gravity Engines Free Energy
0 0

Post a comment