Pitcairn Pa Engine Warner Hp

Biogas Plant Cad Drawing

Pitcaim PA-36 at the top of a "jump takeoff." The jump is made with no power going to the rotor.

(Pitcairn Phott

Pitcaim PA-36 at the top of a "jump takeoff." The jump is made with no power going to the rotor.

(Pitcairn Phott to tip, each of the collars that attached the ribs to the spar would have to be different. Instead of this, the spars were tapered in steps, so that 15 or 20 ribs could be the same in each blade before another size collar was needed. The blades were fabric covered. There was no C AA Type Certificate obtained for this model. No production was undertaken. Only one of the PA-36s flew. The effort was suspended when the company b< came Pitcairn-Larsen Autogiro Company, stayed in business long enough to build the Pti 39s and help C& A Aircraft Co. to get the PA-3S started (G&A was AGA for a short time durin this time they built Waco troop gliders in pu duction for the Air Corps.)

Pitcairn Rotor Head

Agnew Larson, left and Harold Pitcaim, right, examining the rotor head of the PA-36. (Pitcaim Photo)

PitcairnPA36 with Fred"SIim"Soule at the controls. Slim was Pit-cairn's test pilot through most of the PA-22. At! theAC-35, PA 33. PA 34, PA 39 and XO 61 in addition to the PA 36 work.

(Pitcairn Photo)

Agnew Larson, left and Harold Pitcaim, right, examining the rotor head of the PA-36. (Pitcaim Photo)

PitcairnPA36 with Fred"SIim"Soule at the controls. Slim was Pit-cairn's test pilot through most of the PA-22. At! theAC-35, PA 33. PA 34, PA 39 and XO 61 in addition to the PA 36 work.

(Pitcairn Photo)

Pa22 Autogyro Jump Start

Pilcairn PA-39—six were "built" for the British Military from Pitcairn PA-18 autogiros bought back from customers. Wings were removed, horizontal tail replaced and a "direct control" rotor system installed. The Kinner engine and fixed pitch propeller were replaced with Warner "Super Scarab" and constant-speed propeller. (Pitcairn Photo)

About 1941, Harold Pitcairn ceased manufacturing Autogiros. Pitcaim's airfield was acquired by the Navy after an appraisal by real estate experts on the basis of the value of open land. Pitcairn maintained the licensing organization, Autogiro Company of America, and continued as a small group having an office in Jenkintown, Pennsylvania, near Willow Grove.

Paul Stanley, who had joined the Pitcairn organization when the Cierva C-8 came to Willow Grove, was retained as chief engineer. He was assisted by Gage Tidd and Harris "Pat" Campbell, both were excellent mechanical engineers.

The autogiro manufacturing firm became A.G.A. for "Autogiros, Gliders and Airplanes." The name changed to G& A, then Firestone Tire and Rubber Company took over and continued to operate at G&A, a division of Firestone Tire and Rubber Company.

Some of the Pitcairn personnel joined AGA and continued on to Firestone. Agnew Larsen was one of those. At the beginning of World War II, the British government was looking for an aircraft that could be carried aboard ship in a convoy and could be launched and recovered while the convoy was under way. The purpose was to scout for submarines which were taking their toll of English vessels en route with war supplies.

Helicopters were not yet available, so an autogiro was considered. G&A was approached and they proposed a two-place, open cockpit autogiro, using a 165 Warner Super Scarab turning a two-bladed, constant-speed propeller. The model was a PA-39.

The PA-39s were ordered from the Pitcairn organization because of the British-owned Cierva Autogiro Company. The British were using all their aircraft building capacity to produce fighter planes to defend England that is why they turned to Pitcairn for the autogiros. Wing Commander Reggie Brie, a former Cierva Test pilot was the British supervisor for the project.

Because construction materials were critical it was decided to use the PA-18 airframe as a basis for the PA-39.

Seven PA-18s were bought back from their owners, who could, in most cases not use them because of severe restrictions put on private flying during the war.

The only parts actually retained were the fuselage, rotor, pylon, vertical tail, tail wheel, main wheels and brakes. First consideration was to use the Kinner R-5,165hp original equipment

Pitcairn Larsen

(Pitcairn Photc

The production line of PA-39 autogiros inside Pitcairn's factory.

(Pitcairn Photc

The production line of PA-39 autogiros inside Pitcairn's factory.

Pitcairn Rotor Head

Pitcairn PA-39 rear cockpit. (Pitcairn Photo)

Pitcairn PA-39 pyloii, controls and rotor blades. Notice pylori is the same as wire-braced two-strut PA-18 pylon.

(Warren Ship Photo)

Pitcairn PA-39 rear cockpit. (Pitcairn Photo)

Pitcairn PA-39 pyloii, controls and rotor blades. Notice pylori is the same as wire-braced two-strut PA-18 pylon.

(Warren Ship Photo)

Kellett Rotor Pylon

Front view Pitcairn PA-39. (Warren Ship Photo)

engine, but this engine had a tapered crankshaft at the propeller hub and would not accept a constant speed propeller.

Because the rotor was to provide the control of the PA-39 as in the PA-22, 35 and 36, the wings were removed. A new type horizontal tail was designed with slanted vertical pieces referred to as "tip shields."

The rotor head was the same as the PA-36 and was equipped for vertical"jump" takeoff, so the PA-39 could be taken off with no horizontal roll. This feature backed up with a landing speed of zero mph made it a natural for operation from a makeshift flight deck aboard an ocean freighter, to look for Nazi submarines.

Seven were completed. One was retained by Pitcairn for installation of rockets in the tips of the rotor blades. The purpose was to take off with a powered rotor. Using rockets at the blade

Front view Pitcairn PA-39. (Warren Ship Photo)

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